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COVID-19 tests provide much-needed information to help manage the infection – News-Medical.Net

Testing for COVID-19 can give us some much-needed information to help understand and manage this viral infection on an individual, local, national and global level.

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Vietnam sends virus-free UK pilot home – Australian Associated Press

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Vietnam’s most seriously ill COVID-19 patient, a British pilot who at one point seemed close to death, has left hospital on his way home after a dramatic recovery that attracted national attention.

The case of Stephen Cameron, a pilot for national carrier Vietnam Airlines, became a sensation in Vietnam, where a combination of targeted testing and an aggressive quarantine program has kept its coronavirus tally to an impressively low 370 cases, and zero…



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‘No one is safe until everyone is safe’: Vaccine nationalism threatens global coronavirus effort – USA TODAY

Instead of collaboration, coordination and sharing, vaccine nationalism pits nation against nation to get and keep enough doses for their citizens.

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, the U.S. government’s leading infectious disease expert, says he is cautiously optimistic a vaccine “with some degree” of effectiveness will be successfully developed by the beginning of 2021. (8 July)
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A deadly virus causes a global pandemic. A wealthy country signs a $125 million contract for vaccine with a manufacturer in a small nation. But when the vaccine becomesavailable, the small nations government balks, demanding enough for its entire population first before any can be exported.
That’s what happened in 2009, when Australia demanded biotech manufacturer CSL fulfill domestic needs for H1N1 vaccine before any could be sent to the United States. 
And its exactly the scenario public health experts fear as the world enters into a scientifically turbo-charged but chaotic race to create and then produce coronavirus vaccines. Rather than widespread collaboration, coordination and sharing, me first vaccine nationalism pits nation against nation to get and keep enough doses for their citizens. 
Countries are focusing on their own vaccine development programs rather than collaborating to pool resources. Agreements are scarce to share vaccines when theyre available so front line health workers and those in COVID-19 hots spots internationally can have first access.
Further, as what happened in Australia shows, no matter what contracts may be in place, the country where a vaccine is manufactured could slap export restrictions on it to ensure its own population gets first dibs.
When it comes to creating vaccine, the United States has largely chosen to go it alone. It has declined to join international development efforts and instead cut advance deals worth billions of dollars with pharmaceutical and manufacturing companies for control of hundreds of millions of doses.
Its a risky bet say experts.
Many people naively assume its the United States thats going to have (a vaccine) first, because we have several candidates. But that may not be how it goes, said Amesh Adalja a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security.
 (Photo: Getty Images)
Through the White House coronavirus effort, dubbed Operation Warp Speed the United States plans to invest in about seven candidate vaccines. Thats out of 21 vaccine candidates currently in clinical trials globally and another 139 in preclinical evaluation, according to the World Health Organization.
Any sharing efforts will only come after Americas needs are fulfilled, according to Operation Warp Speed officials.
“The vaccine and therapeutic candidates Operation Warp Speed has invested in are the candidates OWS believes to be the most promising. OWS will cooperate with all nations deemed friendly to our national security in order to develop safe and effective COVID-19 countermeasures,” a senior administration official said. 
Vaccine countdown: We’re one-third of the way to a widely available coronavirus vaccine, experts say
Not all vaccines are equal: There are a variety of ways to stop the virus that causes COVID-19
‘I’m a scientist, not a politician’: Health officials answer senators on COVID-19 vaccine
The presidential election looming in November, however, could bring policy changes should the White House change hands. Presumed Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden told a health care activist Wednesday he absolutely positively would commit to sharing technology and access to a coronavirus vaccine if the United States is the first across the finish line.   
In any case, there is no certainty one of the U.S. candidate vaccines will make it there. By some estimates, vaccines that reach human clinical trials have a 17% chance of success said Kate Elder, senior vaccines policy advisor with the humanitarian group Doctors without Borders, which advocates for making vaccines affordable and accessible to all.
Thats a huge failure rate, she said.
Other nations are at least contemplating more collaborative approaches. The European Union is creating a European Vaccine Strategy in which members pool funding, research and manufacturing resources. Any resulting vaccines would be allocated to all members.
France, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands have created an “inclusive vaccine alliance” to pool vaccine development resources and secure vaccine supplies for Europe while also allowing fair access to the vaccine for all countries. 
Another effort is the COVID-19 Global Vaccine Access Facility (Covax). Focused more on low- and middle-income countries, it allows nations to pool resources for research, production and advanced purchase agreements, with each getting a share of vaccines.
Still a work in progress, it launched in June and is meant to counteract vaccine nationalism and give poorer nations a seat at the vaccine table.
Taking part in these types of global vaccine partnerships which the United States has declined to do would be a kind of insurance, said David Fidler, a senior fellow on global health a the Council on Foreign Relations.
(It’s) buying into multiple candidate vaccines so youd at least get part of the production if one or more of them works out, he said.
Global health means vaccine sharing
Another issue is sharing.
To public health experts, nations in an ideal world would collaborate to create vaccines. As soon as one proved safe and effective the formula would be licensed to every facility with the capability of manufacturing it. The resulting doses would go first to front-line health care workers in virus hot spots around the world, then to health workers globally, then to the rest of the worlds population.
That is the best way to protect everyone, said Robbie Silverman, a senior advisor to Oxfam, an international anti-poverty organization based in the United Kingdom.
This is a global pandemic. If the disease is located anywhere in the world, it will come back to the United States, said Silverman, who works on health and inequity issues.
Public health experts acknowledge we do not live in an ideal world.
Its hard to see a politician saying, Yup, lets give 30% of our vaccine to countries in sub-Saharan Africa, said Fidler.
So far few countries outside of vaccine consortia have committed to sharing with less fortunate nations. Its a tough sell, concedes Jason Schwartz, a professor of health policy at the Yale University School of Public Health.
But thats what global health is. Its not just the right thing to do to help countries without resources. It also helps us, he said.
The United States is not embracing that approach. In June, a senior U.S. official said the nations top priority is to get coronavirus vaccine to everyone in America who wants it.
Lets take care of Americans first. To the extent there is a surplus excess vaccine could be used to make sure the rest of the world is vaccinated, the official said.
The same impetus caused the United States to buy up more than 90% of the worlds supply of remdesivir for the next three months. Its one of the few proven treatment for COVID-19 and the purchase, announced July 1, left little for the rest of the world.
The U.S. isnt the only country putting itself first. In the past six months more than 46 nations put export restrictions on medical supplies including masks, gloves, disinfectants and ventilators, according to Professor Simon Evenett, a professor of international trade at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland and creator of the Global Trade Alert initiative, which tracks trade protectionism.
Such behavior, however, isnt a good recipe for stopping COVID-19 public health experts say. As the World Health Organization puts it, No one is safe until everyone is safe.
The geopolitics of securing a vaccine 
A final concern is that once a vaccine or vaccines become available, possession will become nine-tenths of the law. Countries where vaccine is manufactured may not let it out, no matter what contracts the manufacturers have with other nations.
Under international law, any nation has the sovereign right to seize private property for the public good. In the middle of a health emergency, seizing vaccine can be seen as exactly that, said Fidler.
Thats not something any country can or would sign away in connection with vaccine development, he said.
So even if a country had signed a contract to get a certain amount of vaccine being produced in another country, that country could seize it, in legal terms expropriate it.
Its not just a fear. It will happen, said Sam Halabi, a law professor at the University of Missouri and expert on global health law. Not even the best-written contract can blunt the geopolitics of the vaccine.
The hope is that eventually those contracts will be honored, said Thomas Bollyky, director of the global health program at the Council on Foreign Relations.
For now, countries are jockeying for position, trying to best position themselves to get as much vaccine as possible as quickly as possible when one or more become available.
Any attempts to make vaccine distribution more equitable and likely to stop the pandemic globally need to happen now, he said.
Were running out of time, he said. Anything that focuses on allocating according to public health needs instead of the public purse will require some time to put together, and were running out of it.
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Mathon key workers isolating after 73 Covid-19 cases – BBC News

The vegetable pickers and packers will remain on the farm in Herefordshire while isolating.

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The workers, who carry out picking and packing work, are being asked to remain on the farm
About 200 workers on a farm are isolating after 73 people tested positive for Covid-19.
The cases have been found among the workforce of vegetable producers AS Green and Co, based in Mathon in Herefordshire.
Workers are being asked to remain on the farm during a period of isolation, while Herefordshire Council arranges food and essential supplies.
The firm is also being supported by Public Health England (PHE).
It said its staff were its “priority”.
The workers, who carry out picking and packing work during the harvesting season, live in mobile homes on the farm, near Malvern, in Worcestershire.
As a precaution, the council said, they were being treated as “one extended bubble” and were staying within household groups on the farm.
Katie Spence, PHE Midlands health protection director, said the company had implemented a range of infection control measures, including on-site testing, social distancing in communal areas and the indoor packaging area, encouraging regular hand washing and promoting the use of face coverings in closed areas.
“Despite these measures, a small number of workers became symptomatic earlier this week and they and a few close contacts among the workforce were tested initially and found to be positive,” she said.
Karen Wright, director of public health for Herefordshire, said: “Prompt testing on the farm has allowed us to understand transmission and control the spread of infection.
“We continue to support the farm management, their workers, who form an important part of our local economy, and the local community through this challenging time.”
A spokesperson for AS Green added: “Our staff are our priority, they are hard-working key workers helping us provide food for the country during these unusual times.”
From 29 June to 5 July, Herefordshire had a rate of two new cases per 100,000 people, figures from Public Health England show. This compares with Leicester which had 116 cases per 100,000.
Overall, the Herefordshire council area had seen 749 cases as of 7 July.
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