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NRL 2020: St George Illawarra Dragons beat Manly Sea Eagles, match report – NRL.COM

A powerhouse performance from Mikaele Ravalawa has guided the Dragons to a 34-4 win over Manly at Netstrata Jubilee Stadium on Sunday night.

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Ben Hunt’s return to the starting side and attacking sparks from Matt Dufty and Zac Lomax propelled the Dragons to a 34-4 win over Manly on Sunday.
Hunt was influential at hooker, setting up a try and booting Manly into submission by finding the open spaces of Netsrata Jubilee Stadium with kicks before the last tackle.
The Sea Eagles struck first through Joel Thompson but St George Illawarra ran in six unanswered tries – four in the second half – to secure their third victory of the year.
Without injured stars Tom Trbojevic and Dylan Walker and the suspended Addin Fonua-Blake, Manly appeared lost at times.
Dufty’s hot form continued as the fullback recorded 192 metres, 70 of which came from a scintillating first-half try against the grain, while Lomax set up two tries and scored one.
And Dragons winger Mikaele Ravalawa rattled off several monstrous hits – a couple on Brad Parker – that brought the 1571-strong crowd to their feet. He also scored a try.
Manly rung some late changes with Cade Cust replacing Lachlan Croker as starting five-eighth, Brendan Elliot coming in at fullback with Tevita Funa out and prop Morgan Boyle starting.
Second-rower Thompson, once a Dragons fan favourite, overpowered Corey Norman to score from a Daly Cherry-Evans short ball in the eighth minute.
Des Hasler’s side lacked fluency in their following forays to Dragons territory as some sloppy passing stifled their movements.
Dufty finishes off a Lomax intercept
A swirling midfield bomb that found open space looked like it could produce more Sea Eagles points but a dogged St George Illawarra again survived.
Ravalawa revved up the fans into a chant as he maintained the rage in defence.
And the noise soon increased as prop Josh Kerr burst onto a Hunt pass on the last tackle to claim his second NRL try. Lomax’s goal edged the hosts ahead after 29 minutes.
Just when it seemed the Sea Eagles would hit right back,  Dufty’s blinding speed kept St George Illawarra’s party going.
Cherry-Evans made a break but he found Lomax instead of a supporting Manly teammate. The Dragons centre linked with Dufty who scorched up the touchline to extend the lead.
St George Illawarra were lively to begin the second half with halfback Adam Clune nearly engineering a third unanswered try.
Jordan Pereira, in his first game back from a two-game suspension, earned the ire of the officials in being placed on report for a late tackle.
The fans weren’t impressed when Manly successfully challenged a knock-on call and kept possession in attacking range but they stood and applauded after the Dragons’ defence held firm.
A charging Tyson Frizell ended up in the in-goal at the other end, only for the Sea Eagles to prevent him from grounding the Steeden.
Dragons save their best till last
Dufty shot through to collect a ricocheted Norman kick before nudging ahead for himself. Jorge Taufua’s decision to tackle the pocket rocket without the ball saw him sin-binned in the 53rd minute. Lomax added a penalty goal to stretch his side’s advantage to eight.
The Sea Eagles compounded matters by making an error coming out of trouble, saved from paying the price by a Lomax handling error.
But Manly playmaker Lachlan Croker allowed the Dragons to apply more pressure when he kicked out on the full. Dufty forced a repeat set with a grubber and a lovely Lomax flick pass after the restart put Ravalawa over in the corner.
Lomax made sure of the win by taking an intercept from Cade Cust and outsprinting Elliot to the right-hand corner in the 72nd minute.
Norman sent the crowd into raptures when he collected an in-field Clune kick to dive under the posts before Euan Aitken capped off a second-half blitz.

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COVID-19-associated stroke patients have higher risk for severe disability and death – News-Medical.Net

Acute ischemic strokes (AIS) associated with COVID-19 are more severe, lead to worse functional outcomes and are associated with higher mortality , according to new research published yesterday in Stroke, a journal of the American Stroke Association, a divisi…

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Acute ischemic strokes (AIS) associated with COVID-19 are more severe, lead to worse functional outcomes and are associated with higher mortality , according to new research published yesterday in Stroke, a journal of the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association.
In “Characteristics and Outcomes in Patients with COVID-19 and Acute Ischemic Stroke: The Global COVID-19 Stroke Registry,” researchers analyzed data on patients with COVID-19 and AIS treated at 28 health care centers in 16 countries this year and compared them to patients without COVID-19 from the Acute Stroke Registry and Analysis of Lausanne (ASTRAL) Registry, from 2003 to 2019. Researchers sought to determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with COVID-19 and AIS.
Between January 27, 2020 to May 19, 2020, there were 174 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and AIS. Each COVID-19 patient with AIS was matched and compared to a non-COVID-19 AIS patient based on a set of pre-specified factors including age, gender and stroke risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, heart failure, cancer, previous stroke, smoking, obesity and dyslipidemia). The final analysis included 330 patients total.
In both patient groups, stroke severity was estimated with the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and stroke outcome was assessed by the modified Rankin score (mRS). When AIS patients with COVID-19 were compared to non-COVID-19 patients:
COVID-19 patients had more severe strokes (median NIHSS score of 10 vs. 6, respectively);
COVID-19 patients had higher risk for severe disability following stroke (median mRS score 4 vs. 2, respectively); and
COVID-19 patients were more likely to die of AIS.
The researchers noted there are several potential explanations for the relationship between COVID-19-associated strokes and increased stroke severity:
“The increased stroke severity at admission in COVID-19-associated stroke patients compared to the non-COVID-19 cohort may explain the worse outcomes. The broad, multi-system complications of COVID-19, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrhythmias, acute cardiac injury, shock, pulmonary embolism, cytokine release syndrome and secondary infection, probably contribute further to the worse outcomes including higher mortality in these patients. … The association highlights the urgent need for studies aiming to uncover the underlying mechanisms and is relevant for prehospital stroke awareness and in-hospital acute stroke pathways during the current and future pandemics.”
American Heart Association
Ntaios, G., et al. (2020) Characteristics and Outcomes in Patients With COVID-19 and Acute Ischemic Stroke. Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.031208.

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Coronavirus Australia: Nick Coatsworth warns death toll could rise if Australians stop social distancing – NEWS.com.au

Deputy CMO warns coronavirus death toll could rise if Australians stop social distancing

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Australias deputy chief medical officer Nick Coatsworth has issued a stern reminder to anyone becoming complacent about the importance of social distancing, warning the nations death toll will rise if people slip back into old habits. Speaking to reporters Sunday afternoon, Dr Coatsworth’s warning came after Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews announced a man in his 70s had died from coronavirus overnight – the state’s second death this week, bringing the national death toll to 108.
“This is a dangerous time. This is a very challenging time,” Mr Andrews said, days after greater Melbourne and Mitchell Shire re-entered six weeks of a stage-3 lockdown, in an attempt to get Victoria’s COVID-19 resurgence under control.
“I know we are asking a lot of Victorians, but we simply have no choice but to acknowledge the reality that we face and to do what must be done, and that is to follow those rules, to only go out when you need to, and to only go out for the purposes that are lawful.”
The state reported another 273 new infections overnight after a shocking week of record rises in cases.
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But an outbreak in New South Wales, linked to the Crossroads Hotel in Casula, has served as a “timely reminder” to all Australians that “infectious diseases of any sort, particularly ones with pandemic potential, highly infectious ones, do transmit”, Dr Coatsworth said.
The number of coronavirus cases linked to the pub jumped to nine this afternoon, with health authorities urging everyone who attended the venue between July 3 and July 10 to self-isolate and submit for testing.
Dr Coatsworth said people going out and about “need to be very cautious” of the risk we still face without a vaccine yet developed.
“That is not to say that people can’t frequent those venues, of course you can, within the restrictions that the state governments have put on numbers of people and density, but people need to be very cautious, certainly if you have any symptoms of a cold and you are on the road, don’t drop into the roadhouse and sit down and have a meal. Obviously do things like get a takeaway. If the place looks full, move on to the next venue,” he said.
“These are just important, basic things that we are all going to have to do with COVID-19, with the COVID-19 epidemic.”
If people fail to act responsibly, the “reality” is that the death toll will start to climb again, he said.
“That’s the reality of COVID-19. They are the reality of a pandemic. It is possible that the death toll will increase. There is no doubt about that,” he warned.
Our “main weapon” against a surge in deaths and getting any coronavirus outbreaks back under control is “movement restriction and decreasing mixing of individuals”, Dr Coatsworth said.
“The avoidance of what we have seen overseas, which are large numbers of deaths, particularly in elderly members of society, is precisely why we take the measures that we are doing at the moment. We had to do it in February and March. We are doing it again,” he said.
“We know that once movement gets to a certain level – decreases to a certain level, and this has been the case in any situation of a second wave around the world – that the numbers eventually start to drop again.
“The key after that, of course, is to make sure that community transmission stops, that there are no cases of community transmission, and that we do our best to maintain the security of our borders through hotel quarantine and so on and so forth.”
Dr Coatsworth said that, for now, the focus is to get the “particularly significant outbreak” in Victoria under control, and “then go back to what we do best, which is contacting, tracing and eliminating small outbreaks”.
“I don’t think it would be fair to say that that is an unsustainable way to deal with it. The reduction in movement, the reduction in mixing of people is something that is our main tool to deal with COVID-19,” he said.
“What I don’t think we should suggest is that there will be outbreaks of the extent that we have seen in Victoria that would then necessitate the sort of stage three restrictions on the border closures that we have seen in response to this outbreak.”

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